Six Snap Shots of Primary Care: What an EvidenceNOW Practice Looks Like

EvidenceNOW is currently at work in over 1,500 small- and medium-sized primary care practices spanning 12 states and coordinated by 7 Regional Cooperatives. Each Cooperative’s approach to supporting this work differs by the region and populations being served, and takes into account other aspects that make each of these diverse practices unique. While these practices vary widely by many factors, they have in common a strong commitment to providing the best possible care to the 8 million people they serve. Below, read about some of the practices involved in the EvidenceNOW initiative; and check out the Practice Facilitator series and some ESCALATES Learnings for more details on how EvidenceNOW Cooperatives are working with practices to implement the EvidenceNOW aims.



A part of the HealthyHearts NYC Cooperative in New York City, Dr. Vidya Valada’s practice in midtown Manhattan is small but nimble. With a staff of only four (and she the only physician) days can be long, especially with administrative work happening outside of clinic hours. Being a small team can also be a perk: the office can adjust and adapt quickly when opportunities for improving care arise, and their patients receive exceptionally personalized care.

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The main focus of the Scenic Bluffs Community Health Care Centers in Cashton, Wisconsin is keeping their diverse community healthy — and a diverse community it is. As a Federally Qualified Health Center located inside a former bowling alley, Scenic Bluffs got its start over 20 years ago as a mobile bus-based clinic. Today they provide personal and attentive medical care to area families, plus everything from connecting them with housing services to providing a hitching post for patients visiting from the nearby Amish community.

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At CP & RP McManus in Arlington, Virginia, family medicine is literally the family business. Husband-and-wife team Chris and Laurie McManus run the practice started by Chris’ parents in 1961 (and where his father still sees patients). The practice has been a fixture in the community for decades, fostering strong and lasting relationships with the families in the area; this in turn allows for the providers to treat the whole patient, catch issues early, and improve care quality on an ongoing basis.

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Nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Morgantown, North Carolina, Burke Primary Care provides full-service primary care to their suburban community. In addition to standard family practice services, Burke offers lab and imaging, mammography, diabetes education and occupational health services within their clinic. To provide patients with the care they need, Burke also employs a full-time patient care coordinator to monitor high-risk patients and those who have long-term health issues.

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Walker’s Point Community Clinic in Milwaukee, Wisconsin serves as an entry-to-care clinic for uninsured and homeless patients in the area — many of whom would otherwise go to the emergency room. Providing crucial screenings and services to a diverse group of patients, nurse practitioner Steve Ohly and his team focus on preventive health as a critical component of primary care, and utilize health coaching to support patients as they make positive changes.

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In Richmond, Virginia, St. Joseph’s Outreach Clinic sees patients at their tiny primary care practice within the Bon Secours Richmond Health System. Much of their diverse population is underinsured or unable to make it into the clinic, so the staff takes to the streets in a Care-A-Van — a large green and blue van that travels to area churches and transforms them temporarily into mobile health clinics. More than 20 of these stops are made each month, with over 12,500 patient visits conducted annually.

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